Singapore Precious Metal Refinery - Merlion Gold Bar


    In March 2015, the Singapore government officially granted a license to SPMR to use Singapore's national hallmark of the Merlion on gold bars. The Merlion is now an internationally recognized gold-bar brand.

The national personification and symbol of Singapore is the Merlion, and the symbol is printed on the gold and silver produced by SPMR in order to manifest a significant position Merlion gold bar has in the international gold market. It is also a display of significant attention from the Singaporean government given to SPMR by authorizing the national symbol being printed on SPMR-produced bullion bars. These gold bars can be used and liquidated in over 190 countries and is among the finest gold in the world.


























The Story of Singapore Merlion



      The Merlion is a mythical creature and like most mythical creatures. In Sanskrit, ‘Singa’ means lion and ‘Pura’ means city. The island was originally called Temasek, Javanese for ‘Sea Town’. The story of Sang Nila Utama is most popularly accepted as the story of Singapore. The Sejarah Melayu proclaims him the first king of Suvarnabhoomi (ancient Sanskrit name of Malay peninsula), the son of an Indian Prince and a fairy princess who lived under the sea. From atop a hill on Bintan, he spotted an island with blinding white sand that intrigued him. He alighted on the island amidst a thunderstorm and spotted an auspicious beast identified as a lion by his chief minister who was on board his ship. And so he (re)named the island Singapura. The explanation could be as simple as the fact that Temasek was originally a fishing village and the fishtail simply in remembrance of that.The Merlion is a mythical creature and like most mythical creatures. In Sanskrit, ‘Singa’ means lion and ‘Pura’ means city. The island was originally called Temasek, Javanese for ‘Sea Town’. The story of Sang Nila Utama is most popularly accepted as the story of Singapore. The Sejarah Melayu proclaims him the first king of Suvarnabhoomi (ancient Sanskrit name of Malay peninsula), the son of an Indian Prince and a fairy princess who lived under the sea. From atop a hill on Bintan, he spotted an island with blinding white sand that intrigued him. He alighted on the island amidst a thunderstorm and spotted an auspicious beast identified as a lion by his chief minister who was on board his ship. And so he (re)named the island Singapura. The explanation could be as simple as the fact that Temasek was originally a fishing village and the fishtail simply in remembrance of that.